Your routing number identifies the location where your account was opened. You'll often be asked for your checking account routing number when you're making a payment online or by phone. It's also referred to as an RTN, a routing transit number or an ABA routing number.


You can see your full account number and routing number when you log in to Online Banking. You'll find a link in the "I'd like to'' list on your checking account transactions page. 


There are actually two components you'll need when providing routing number information.



Your bank routing number is a nine-digit code that's based on the U.S. Bank location where your account was opened. It's the first set of numbers printed on the bottom of your checks, on the left side. You can also find it in the U.S. Bank routing number chart below. 


Your account number (usually 10-12 digits) is specific to your personal account. It's the second set of numbers printed on the bottom of your checks, just to the right of the bank routing number. You can also find your account number on your monthly statement








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